Your TV Could be Controlling your Mind

The technology exists to allow your TV to control your central nervous system! There are several different patents relating to this kind of technology that have been registered.

If you don’t remember your high school biology class, the central nervous system is what controls most of your bodies functions. It consists of two parts: the brain and the spinal cord. The brain of course is responsible for your thoughts and senses. It is what interprets the world around you. Your spinal cord is the part of your body that transmits messages from your brain to the other parts of your body. It acts as a “highway” that carries information to and from its destination.

“Physiological effects have been observed in a human subject in response to stimulation of the skin with weak electromagnetic fields that are pulsed with certain frequencies near ½ Hz or 2.4 Hz, such as to excite a sensory resonance. Many computer monitors and TV tubes, when displaying pulsed images, emit pulsed electromagnetic fields of sufficient amplitudes to cause such excitation. It is therefore possible to manipulate the nervous system of a subject by pulsing images displayed on a nearby computer monitor or TV set. For the latter, the image pulsing may be imbedded(sic) in the program material, or it may be overlaid by modulating a video stream”

To simply that, most devices with a screen can be used to control your nervous system.

The quote above comes directly from a patent abstract. (A full list of patents relating to this technology is below)

Another one of these patented technologies boasts the ability to cause “sleepiness, drowziness, relaxation, a tonic smile, ptosis of the eyelids, a tense feeling, sudden loose stool, or sexual excitement.”

The inventor of this “mind control” technology is Hendricus G. Loos. Information about who Hendricus G. Loos is, and what he does is incredibly sparse. He was at one point, and might still be, employed for DARPA. DARPA is an agency that does advanced research for the Department of Defense. Interestingly enough, his name is also an anagram for “Source Holdings”.

Hendricus G. Loos has patented several different technologies relating to controlling the central nervous system. Below is a list of the ones I have discovered.

Nervous system manipulation by electromagnetic fields from monitors

US 6506148 B2 | 1 Jun 2001

Physiological effects have been observed in a human subject in response to stimulation of the skin with weak electromagnetic fields that are pulsed with certain frequencies near ½ Hz or 2.4 Hz, such as to excite a sensory resonance. Many computer monitors and TV tubes, when displaying pulsed images, emit pulsed electromagnetic fields of sufficient amplitudes to cause such excitation. It is therefore possible to manipulate the nervous system of a subject by pulsing images displayed on a nearby computer monitor or TV set. For the latter, the image pulsing may be imbedded in the program material, or it may be overlaid by modulating a video stream, either as an RF signal or as a video signal. The image displayed on a computer monitor may be pulsed effectively by a simple computer program. For certain monitors, pulsed electromagnetic fields capable of exciting sensory resonances in nearby subjects may be generated even as the displayed images are pulsed with subliminal intensity.

Remote magnetic manipulation of nervous systems

US 6238333 B1 | 10 Aug 1999

Apparatus and method for remote manipulation of nervous systems by the magnetic dipole field of a rotating bar magnet. Reliance on modulation of spontaneous spiking patterns of sensory nerve receptors, and exploitation of a resonance mechanism of certain neural circuits, allows the use of very weak magnetic fields. This, together with the large magnetic moments that can be obtained with a permanent bar magnet, makes it possible to effectively manipulate the nervous system of a subject over a distance of several hundred meters, using a small portable battery-powered device. The method can be used in law enforcement for standoff situations.

Pulse variability in electric field manipulation of nervous systems

US 6167304 A | 17 Jun 1999

Apparatus and method for manipulating the nervous system of a subject by applying to the skin a pulsing external electric field which, although too weak to cause classical nerve stimulation, modulates the normal spontaneous spiking patterns of certain kinds of afferent nerves. For certain pulse frequencies the electric field stimulation can excite in the nervous system resonances with observable physiological consequences. Pulse variability is introduced for the purpose of thwarting habituation of the nervous system to the repetitive stimulation, or to alleviate the need for precise tuning to a resonance frequency, or to control pathological oscillatory neural activities such as tremors or seizures. Pulse generators with stochastic and deterministic pulse variability are disclosed, and the output of an effective generator of the latter type is characterized.

Electric fringe field generator for manipulating nervous systems

US 6081744 A | 17 Jul 1998

Apparatus and method for manipulating the nervous system of a subject through afferent nerves, modulated by externally applied weak fluctuating electric fields, tuned to certain frequencies such as to excite a resonance in neural circuits. Depending on the frequency chosen, excitation of such resonances causes in a human subject relaxation, sleepiness, sexual excitement, or the slowing of certain cortical processes. The electric field used for stimulation of the subject is induced by a pair of field electrodes charged to opposite polarity and placed such that the subject is entirely outside the space between the field electrodes. Such configuration allows for very compact devices where the field electrodes and a battery-powered voltage generator are contained in a small casing, such as a powder box. The stimulation by the weak external electric field relies on frequency modulation of spontaneous spiking patterns of afferent nerves. The method and apparatus can be used by the general public as an aid to relaxation, sleep, or arousal, and clinically for the control and perhaps the treatment of tremors and seizures, and disorders of the autonomic nervous system, such as panic attacks.

Manipulation of nervous systems by electric fields

US 5899922 A | 14 Nov 1997

Apparatus and method for manipulating the nervous system of a subject through afferent nerves, modulated by an externally applied weak electric field. The field frequency is to be chosen such that the modulation causes excitation of a sensory resonance. The resonances found so far include one near 1/2 Hz which affects the autonomic nervous system, and a resonance near 2.4 Hz that causes slowing of certain cortical processes. Excitation of the 1/2 Hz autonomic resonance causes relaxation, sleepiness, ptosis of the eyelids, or sexual excitement, depending on the precise frequency used. The weak electric field for causing the excitation is applied to skin areas away from the head of the subject, such as to avoid substantial polarization current densities in the brain. Very weak fields suffice for bringing about the physiological effects mentioned. This makes it possible to excite sensory resonances with compact battery powered devices that have a very low current consumption. The method and apparatus can be used by the general public as an aid to relaxation, sleep, or sexual arousal, and clinically for the control and perhaps the treatment of tremors and seizures, and disorders of the autonomic nervous system, such as panic attacks.

Subliminal acoustic manipulation of nervous systems

US 6017302 A | 31 Oct 1997

In human subjects, sensory resonances can be excited by subliminal atmospheric acoustic pulses that are tuned to the resonance frequency. The 1/2 Hz sensory resonance affects the autonomic nervous system and may cause relaxation, drowsiness, or sexual excitement, depending on the precise acoustic frequency near 1/2 Hz used. The effects of the 2.5 Hz resonance include slowing of certain cortical processes, sleepiness, and disorientation. For these effects to occur, the acoustic intensity must lie in a certain deeply subliminal range. Suitable apparatus consists of a portable battery-powered source of weak subaudio acoustic radiation. The method and apparatus can be used by the general public as an aid to relaxation, sleep, or sexual arousal, and clinically for the control and perhaps treatment of insomnia, tremors, epileptic seizures, and anxiety disorders. There is further application as a nonlethal weapon that can be used in law enforcement standoff situations, for causing drowsiness and disorientation in targeted subjects. It is then preferable to use venting acoustic monopoles in the form of a device that inhales and exhales air with subaudio frequency.

Method and apparatus for manipulating nervous systems

US 5782874 A | 24 Jan 1997

Apparatus and method for manipulating the nervous system of a subject through afferent nerves, modulated by externally applied weak fluctuating electric fields, tuned to certain frequencies such as to excite a resonance in certain neural circuits. Depending on the frequency chosen, excitation of such resonances causes relaxation, sleepiness, sexual excitement, or the slowing of certain cortical processes. The weak electric field for causing the excitation is applied to skin areas away from the head of the subject, such as to avoid substantial polarization current densities in the brain. By exploiting the resonance phenomenon, these physiological effects can be brought about by very weak electric fields produced by compact battery-operated devices with very low current assumption. The fringe field of doublet electrodes that form a parallel-plate condenser can serve as the required external electric field to be administered to the subject’s skin. Several such doublets can be combined such as to induce an electric field with short range, suitable for localized field administration. A passive doublet placed such as to face the doublet on either side causes a boost of the distant induced electric field, and allows the design of very compact devices. The method and apparatus can be used by the general public as an aid to relaxation, sleep, or arousal, and clinically for the control and perhaps the treatment of tremors and seizures, and disorders of the autonomic nervous system, such as panic attacks.

Thermal excitation of sensory resonances

US 5800481 A | 28 Dec 1995

In man, autonomic and cortical resonances of the nervous system can be excited by inducing subliminal heat pulses in the skin by means of a resistive heat patch, laser, heat lamp, or microwave radiation, or through a slow air jet that carries a small periodic fluctuation in temperature. Deeply subliminal skin temperature oscillations of frequency near 1/2 Hz induced in a subject by any of these means cause sleepiness, drowziness, relaxation, a tonic smile, ptosis of the eyelids, a tense feeling, sudden loose stool, or sexual excitement, depending on the precise pulse frequency used. For certain higher frequencies, the induced subliminal skin temperature oscillations cause fractured thought and a slowing of certain cortical processes. The method and apparatus can be used by the general public as an aid to relaxation, sleep, or arousal, and clinically for the control and perhaps treatment of tremors, seizures, and emotional disorders. There is further application in the form of nonlethal weapons, involving a pulsed infrared laser or a pulsed microwave beam, tuned to a sensory resonance pulse frequency.

Magnetic excitation of sensory resonances

US 5935054 A | 7 Jun 1995

The invention pertains to influencing the nervous system of a subject by a weak externally applied magnetic field with a frequency near 1/2 Hz. In a range of amplitudes, such fields can excite the 1/2 sensory resonance, which is the physiological effect involved in “rocking the baby”. The wave form of the stimulating magnetic field is restricted by conditions on the spectral power density, imposed in order to avoid irritating the brain and the risk of kindling. The method and apparatus can be used by the general public as an aid to relaxation, sleep, or arousal, and clinically for the control of tremors, seizures, and emotional disorders.

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Shayne Thiessen

Shayne Thiessen

Shayne is enrolled in Business Information Technologies at Red River College in Winnipeg Manitoba. He has a passion for politics, photography and technology. Born and raised in a small farming community, Shayne believes in small government and personal liberty.

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3 Comments on "Your TV Could be Controlling your Mind"

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King King
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Is there any evidence of this technology being used?

Privacy Man
Guest

That’s actually creapy///

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